Supporting mobile game requirements and architecture
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Videos from the Mobile Game Arch workshop in Nordic Game 2013 Conference

The second Mobile Game Arch workshop was organized in Malmö on the 24th of May 2013. This one-day workshop was organized by EGDF and the Mobile Game Arch Project in co-operation with Nordic Game Conference. Download the full report from here.

SESSION 1: 14:00 – 14:45 GAP ANALYSIS OF MOBILE GAME ARCHITECTURE

MGA has identified several areas seriously needing improvement, ranging from the protection of minors, over payments, to the lack of communication between hardware, OS, and ecosystem owners and the game developers. How could these problems best be fixed to the advantage of European mobile games developers?

Keynote: Maarten Noyons, NCC, France

Presentation: Gemma Paris, ARM, United Kingdom

The panel:

SESSION 2: 15:00 – 15:45 EUROPE AND THE WORLD

The distribution of cell phones is in emerging markets today almost as high as in the developed countries. Its importance to the society itself is sometimes even bigger, taking into consideration the absence of PC’s and classic broadband. Specifically in territories with low connectivity like India, Middle East and Africa the relative important of the mobile device may not be underestimated. This concerns marketing, payment, cultural issues, but also other related issues in order to become truly local and global at the same time.

Keynote: Andrej Dementiev, Fortumo, Estonia

Panel:         

SESSION 3: 16:00 – 16:45 STANDARDS AND MOBILE GAMES

In the mobile ecosystem, the leading standardization bodies are World Wide Web consortium (W3C), European Telecommunication Standards Institute (ETSI), Open Mobile Alliance (OMA), Khronos Group, GSM Association (GSMA). It can be taken as a given fact that SMEs, and especially mobile game or application developer studios, have no discernible influence on standards. Beyond technical standardisation, the question is how (IOS, Android etc.) can comply to a common standard which unifies age rating in Europe and simplifies this important issue for the end consumer. This standardization process should be made possible with the strong involvement of the European development community and not be controlled mainly by off-line overseas game publishers.

Keynote: Jean-Charles Point, JCP-Consult, France

Presentation: Patrick Quillemin, ETSI, France

Panel

  • Jean-Charles Point, JCP-Consult, France
  • Annie Mullins, Vodafone, United Kingdom
  • Thierry Platon, SNJV, France
  • Patrick Quillemin, ETSI, France